Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

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Extended play for today

December 30, 2013
courtesy Vic Mars.

courtesy Vic Mars.

Well, Matt aka Vic Mars just sent me his latest EP, the second installment of “Extended play for today”, entitled – what else? – Extended play for today: two. Six tracks in total of cool, laid-back electronic music with a nice retro feel. I haven’t been able to give it that many spins yet, but my faves so far is the quirky, electro-funk Foxmoor Casuals and the kinda Kraftwerk Music 500.

Like I’ve stated earlier, Vic must’ve been really inspired by the class room films we all saw back in the 1980s, because he emulates the sounds and feel just perfectly. Check it out here and make sure to visit his Facebook for the cool, giallo-esque video entitled Teufel Kosmisch.

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Ecstasy

December 20, 2013
copyright Sellergren Design 2013!

copyright Sellergren Design 2013!

Hey, new week and a new goodies available on my Society 6: Ecstasy; silver, gold, red and blue on black. Available as art print and stretched canvas. You can get it here and join me on Facebook here. Have a great weekend!

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Rue Morgue Magazine!

December 3, 2013
courtesy Rue Morgue Magazine!

courtesy Rue Morgue Magazine!

Oh, man this is big. I mean real big. This is huge! Just found out that the December issue of Rue Morgue Magazine includes not only interviews and features on William Friedkin (it’s the 40th anniversary of The Exorcist), Wes Craven (regarding The Serpent and the Rainbow), the recently reformed (and touring) GOBLIN (!!!), but also a review/feature of Call Me Greenhorn‘s faux zombie-OST L’Isola dei Morti Viventi! Yikes! How’s that for an early X-mas present?

Wrapped in a gorgeous sleeve courtesy Jason Edmiston (you gotta check out his stuff on Facebook, it’s amazing!) and filled with tons more goodies plus a giveaway, you can get your copy here (subscriptions available too!) Once again, the zombie album:

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Loud Comix issue 2 preview

December 2, 2013
cover by Sellergren Design

cover by Sellergren Design

I’m stoked as hell to announce that Jamie Vayda just made some choice panels from the coming second issue of Loud Comix official on his Facebook page! Wrapped in a sleeve by yours truly, the issue offers stories by Sal Canzonieri (of Electric Frankenstein fame), Darin MartinezRest Stop of the Dead, and Erika Lane‘s hilariously looking Lester the Porn Fairy (!!!) among others. Check it out here.

Both Jamie and the comic book’s been getting lots of positive feedback lately (well deserved if you ask me!) as he’s not only bringing back the classic, old school underground comic but also doing a damn fine job doing it. After the first, self-published issue the comic was picked up by Birdcage Bottom Books and now they’ll be hauled off to New York to represent at the Society of Illustrators‘ prestigious Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (cleverly abbreviated MoCCA.)

The issue will be out this month, and you can can get it via Birdcage Bottom Books here. Check it out!

courtesy Jamie Vaida and Erika Lane

courtesy Jamie Vaida and Erika Lane

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Alan Forbes benefit

November 13, 2013

alanforbes

Via the Secret Serpents official blog comes bummer news:

On Monday, October 21st, Alan Forbes was attacked in the Lower Haight neighborhood of San Francisco. The attack left him with two skull fractures and damage to his right eye.

As do a lot of artists, he has no insurance to cover the growing medical expenses. To help cover the medical expenses there are two benefit shows set up in San Francisco as well as other fundraisers. Each show will have silent auctions.

Contributing bands include acts such as Queens of the Stone Age and AFI, with artists including personal fave Stainboy.

Get details via the blog or their official page on Facebook. Spread the word!

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Sonny Chiba Toyota Ad

November 13, 2013
copyright Toyota Japan!

copyright Toyota Japan!

“If you are gonna drive, drive dirty!” Via the Daily Grindhouse page on Facebook I found this Sonny Chiba ad for Toyota Big Carina. Personally I always thought The Streetfighter would drive a gas guzzling 70’s GTO or something, but hey, I still remember the larynx-ripping end scene of said movie and am not gonna question the guy.

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Mugger

November 2, 2013
Java the 'Pus.

Java the ‘Pus.

Well, November’s finally here and I busied myself on Society 6 as they recently launched their premium ceramic coffee mugs and I had to sit down and format some of my previous designs I deemed fitting.

Available in 11 and 15 ounce sizes – reminding me of that classic Bill Hicks joke “You want the 42 oz, or the large?” – there are seventeen designs available, including my personal fave Octaman!.

Shipping within the U.S. is roughly $6 (I’m guessing peeps on Hawaii gotta add some bucks), with us Europeans paying more. Check ‘em out here and join me on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SellergrenDesign.

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An interview with Tal Zimerman

October 19, 2013

(NOTE: this originally appears on the Swedish Gore Film Society website)

Tal Zimerman at Home

The world is full of creativity. That is certainly nothing new, but thanks to the digital age the odds for someone having their dream project realized has become much, much better. Thanks to Kickstarter and Indiegogo (easily some of my fave websites) anyone can pitch their idea to the world and with a bit of luck get it financed. Being a believer in all things D.I.Y. I consider this a healthy and promising phenomenon and try to support interesting projects as much as my wallet allows me.

Tal Zimerman‘s pretty known among horror fans as he’s not only a writer for both Rue Morgue Magazine and Fangoria, but also an authority when it comes to genre movie posters. I recently found out about his upcoming crowdsourced documentary Why Horror?, a look at the psychology behind this phenomenon, and immediately decided to jump on board.  Ambitiously aiming to produce the most comprehensive documentary on the topic, Tal and Co. already amassed an impressive list of interviewees (George Romero, John Carpenter and Eli Roth just to mention a few), and plan to travel around the world in order to cover every aspect of this old phenomenon. Wanting to find out more, as well as help spread the word, I sat down and sent off a couple of questions his way, which he graciously answered.

So tell me a bit of the origins of the documentary. From my understanding it actually mutated from a different sort of concept.
Yes, that’s true.  I wanted to shoot an hour for TV that focussed on Toronto, where I live.  We would see how very horror-centric this city is, from festivals to famous shooting locations, to social activities and everything in between. There’s a pretty big horror community here and we all agree that we are spoiled rotten with things to do.  The production company I approached, with whom I had worked on a comedy project, was kind of baffled by my outward horror fan persona.  We got to talking about why I like horror, and why people in general, everywhere like horror.  So we decided to abandon the local focus and go global and that a feature film exploring all these things was best for the scope of the idea.

John CarpenterYou chose to have this crowdfunded. Considering the popularity of horror these days, did you consider having it produced by a studio? Was there any pitching for producers involved or did you immediately decide to go with Kickstarter?
I’m actually working with a great production company who specializes in TV comedy here in Canada. The feature length documentary format is new for all of us. There are producers on the project and they pitched it at a local documentary conference. We secured a broadcaster and managed to acquire a bit of funding for development.  The Kickstarter idea came when we realized that the costs of travel and film clip licensing were going to require a lot of money.  Almost everything that you saw in the demo was shot here in Toronto.  To tell the story we really want to tell, we need to travel and we need to show movie clips.

You managed to amass a quite impressive list of people for this! Tell me a bit of that process.
Again that comes back to where the production is located.  We have the Toronto International Film Festival and the Fan Expo, two enormous festivals that bring in top talent.  Having attended both shows for over 10 years, you meet people who know people who can introduce you to people.  Nothing is ever that easy, though.  You still have to hustle and nag and beg.  TIFF is especially tough because distribution companies fly in these directors to talk about the movie they are promoting and we’re talking about horror in general.  It helps to have people on the inside to get those kinds of interviews.  Having an interesting subject matter helps, too.  In reading the description of our movie, a lot of people want to express their ideas on the subject, so it’s just a matter of getting our material into the right hands.

George RomeroCROPPEDAs far as I know, this is the first attempt at covering the psychology behind the horror phenomena. Has there been any real revealing surprises while conducting those interviews?
Lots.  Without spoiling anything, I will say that spooking each other out is a very old custom.  Reminding the people around us of our mortality goes back to pre-language civilization.  Wanting to explain what’s on the other side is a natural, human desire.  Not all of us are content with what religion, or even science has to say about death.  And the more you attempt to cover it up, or try to escape,  the more abstract and creative the ways it bubbles to the surface are.  That, and also the fact that John Carpenter is a huge video gamer.  That blew my mind.

Considering some of the past high-brow snubbing of the genre, did you notice a change of attitude among the academics, or has there been some typical “this is garbage and it turns children into serial killers” sentiments vented like back in the hysterical 80s?
Its funny, we have tried to find people who are vehemently opposed to horror, like a larger anti-horror sentiment, it’s not there like it was in the 80s.  We are getting individuals telling us that their parents or co-workers have voiced concerns about their mental health because of horror, and that they can’t wait for our movie to help them explain their passion, but no big anti-horror movement to speak of.  There was some interesting stuff happening when movies like Saw and Hostel came out, and the idiotic label “torture porn” reared its head, but that goes back ten years.  In the time since, TV shows like Dexter, True Blood, and The Walking Dead have brought horror to the mainstream and into people’s houses – and they LOVE it.  So the genre is really at its peak of popularity and that’s another reason why now was the right time to do this film.

Eli RothCROPPEDI agree. The timing’s perfect. Personally I’d like to know why this genre is so polarizing. (The only other form of cinema doing that being porn.) Do you have anything to share regarding that? Why do people either love it or hate it but rarely anything in between?
It’s sort of designed to do that.  It’s safe to say that there are reactions to horror, both physical and mental, in everyone who sees it, but not everyone is going to enjoy that reaction.  But anything that pushes boundaries, which is one of horror’s main functions, is going to upset some people and delight others.  Some people are naturally curious and adventurous.  Others are content in the safety of their shells.  It comes down to personality.

Also, covering the various aspects of horror all over the world. Have you noticed any big differences? With the exception of noticing Euro horror being a bit more “arty” than the pragmatic U.S. films I really can’t say I’ve studied it at any length, but are we afraid of different things?
We are most certainly afraid of different things, or at least, have very different ways of approaching our anxieties.  In Japan, for example, there are several examples of folklore with haunted spaces and spirits trying to manipulate the living.  These tie in to that society’s family-related anxieties.  In Australia, the vast emptiness of the deserts have created a fear of isolation, which has been the theme of many great Oz-horror films.  In the end, though, it all comes back to the fear of death.  How that fear is represented is very driven by local attitudes.

How much of the documentary is already finished? How are you looking to expand it with the crowdsourced budget?
It’s hard to say, quantitatively, how much is finished.  We have roughly 40 interviews, mostly with film-centric individuals.  We still need to talk to art and literature historians, psychologists, and video game developers.  We definitely know what we want to talk about, and a budget from crowdsourcing will, for example, allow us to show works of art in museums and galleries, as opposed to jpegs.  It will give us the ability to talk to video game developers in Japan directly instead of just showing their works.  The movie is definitely happening, but a little extra push can take us a long way.

As it is feature length: Will we see this having a theatrical release?
I hope so.  It will appear on TV here in Canada next year, and we’re hoping to show it at some festivals before that.  We’re shooting with the theatre experience in mind, so we’re all hoping for a theatrical release.

So am I! Best of luck with the project, Tal.

Interview by Magnus Sellergren.
Photos courtesy Tal Zimerman.

Make sure to check out the project on Kickstarter and join them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/WhyHorror. Again, the pitch video:

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Jack-o-Lantern!

October 12, 2013
copyright Sellergren Design 2013!

copyright Sellergren Design 2013!

Here we go: The latest addition to my page on Society 6, Jack-o-Lantern! Pretty fitting considering the season and so far the response has been great! Available as art prints, t-shirts, iPhone skins etc., plus stickers via my page on Red Bubble. Check ‘em out, keep in mind there’s still free shipping worldwide up until October 13th and join up on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SellergrenDesign.

Speaking of which, Call Me Greenhorn‘s latest EP The Ghost of Lee Van Cleef is still available. It’s a $2 download so check it out here and give it a spin below.

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Art Treats!

October 9, 2013
copyright Danita Art 2013!

copyright Danita Art 2013!

Well, with me working double time to add some new, cool Halloween-themed designs to my page on Society 6, I’ve also had the time to browse and see what other artists are coming up with.

Visiting the page and searching “Halloween” generates some 50+ pages, and here are just some of the cool stuff I’ve found. Check them out:

copyright Danita Art 2013!

copyright Danita Art 2013!

The Black Cat and The Jack-o-Lantern by Danita Art. All of her work is just gorgeous. Well worth a look!

copyright Object Unknown 2013!

copyright Object Unknown 2013!

Fans of cult classic Return of the Living Dead should get themselves Tarman by Object Unknown. Cool stuff!

copyright Tyler Wintermute 2013!

copyright Tyler Wintermute 2013!

Black Cat by Tyler Wintermute. He’s got tons more via his official website (link available on Society 6).

copyright Rob Zangrillo 2013!

copyright Rob Zangrillo 2013!

Franken-pieces by Rob Zangrillo.

copyright Vintage Cuteness 2013!

copyright Vintage Cuteness 2013!

Halloween by toy collector/photographer Marian/Vintage Cuteness.

copyright Exit Man 2013!

copyright Exit Man 2013!

Devil Cat by Exit Man.

I’m adding artwork on a weekly basis, and again, best way to keep track is joining me on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SellergrenDesign. You’ll find my prints on Society 6 at http://society6.com/SellergrenDesign (and if you use this link you’ll get free shipping worldwide up until October 13th!). Cheers!

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